Homeowner concerned HOA has too much cash reserve

Can a homeowners association have too much cash in reserves?

A: Your question is interesting, because we haven’t encountered too many homeowners associations with reserves that are too high. We usually hear about HOAs that have no reserves or too little in the way of cash on hand. When something goes wrong or whenever there is a need for additional funds that are outside of the annual budget, these associations are quick to levy special assessments on their owners.

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11 High-Yield REITs to Buy for Big Income

Investors looking to bolster their income portfolios have long looked to dividend-friendly real estate investment trusts (REITs) to get the job done. But recently, the appeal of high-yield REITs has intensified, thanks to changes to conventional investing wisdom.

For more than a quarter century, the “4% rule” governed many investors’ withdrawals from retirement savings. According to this rule, investors would have sufficient funds in their portfolio to last a lifetime if no more than 4% was withdrawn from the portfolio in year one of retirement, with the withdrawal rate in subsequent years increasing only as much as needed to keep pace with inflation. Dividend investors, then, could comply with the 4% rule and never need to touch their principal by building a portfolio that yields 4%.

Source: 11 High-Yield REITs to Buy for Big Income

Real History by Jeff LaHurd: Sarasota’s early housing developments

These daughters of a wealthy physician were world travelers before Katherine discovered Sarasota in 1903. Miss Daisy and their mother followed a few years later, searching, as had so many others, for the salubrious climate that Sarasota promised.

McClellan Park is an early forerunner of today’s modern housing developments. Platted by Katherine Elizabeth McClellan of Massachusetts and marketed by her and her sister, Daisietta “Miss Daisy” McClellan. The development occupied a 56-acre tract complete with bay views, a clubhouse, a private yacht basin and social amenities. These daughters of a wealthy physician were world travelers before Katherine discovered Sarasota in 1903. Miss Daisy and their mother followed a few years later, searching, as had so

Source: Real History by Jeff LaHurd: Sarasota’s early housing developments

Ten Questions With Jerry Pi of Pi Capital Partners on Developing in 2020, Fixing Midtown, and What’s Next For Queens

YIMBY recently sat down with Jerry Pi, of the eponymous Pi Capital Partners, whose principals are comprised of Jerry and his father. From developing affordable and market-rate housing in the Outer Boroughs, to a new skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan just steps from the Empire State Building, the firm’s activities in New York City have been extensive. Today’s interview covers the firm’s origins, the importance of transportation and infrastructure improvements to a functioning Midtown Manhattan, and what may be

Source: Ten Questions With Jerry Pi of Pi Capital Partners on Developing in 2020, Fixing Midtown, and What’s Next For Queens

Let’s do away with real estate broker fees

FOR DECADES, the laws of supply and demand have weighed heavily toward landlords and the 3,000-plus real estate agents scattered across brokerage offices in Allston, Brighton, and Brookline. Historical market conditions have cemented a business model of brokers collecting a payment of one month’s rent from renters and it’s taken a global pandemic to blast a hole in the foundation of that model. Seemingly overnight, negotiating power has now been given to the renter, paving the way for innovation in the apar

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Which documents should you save once your mortgage is paid in full? 

Q: I have a small condo I just paid off. After watching your Expert Real Estate Tips YouTube Channel, I contacted my mortgage company requesting documentation. The only documents they provided were a letter stating the loan is paid in full and a certificate of satisfaction of the mortgage.

Are these two documents all I need to prove that I paid off my mortgage or do I want them to give me anything else? Do I need to keep a copy of the title insurance for my records? Is it still valuable? And, is it safe to shred the loan application and any documents relating to the loan?

A: Here’s some good news: Your lender gave you just about everything you need. The lender told you that your loan is paid in full and gave you the documentation stating that the lien or trust deed on your property has been released.

Source: Which documents should you save once your mortgage is paid in full?